Summer Reading

20130728-223833.jpg

Advertisements

this, my “innovating style”

maybe you met me and my post-it notes last year…

“No one understands your relationship with paper but you… The fact is, your piles of paper make sense to you and represent ongoing, intellectual, active thoughts… You need it around because it enables your specialized thinking to work… Malcolm Gladwell… says of people like you, “They can’t file because they haven’t yet sorted and filed the ideas in their head.  It isn’t a sign of disorganization, but rather a sign of complexity.””

from Organizing for Your Brain Type by Lanna Nakone

Organizing For Your Brain Type: Finding Your Own Solution to Managing Time, Paper, and Stuff

ha!


teaching with intention

i love how she explains the shift in her practice, and how she explains her choices.  being able to articulate the rationale behind our choices in the classroom and being able to understand someone else’s choices, i think, is so important to being a reflective and intentional teacher. i LOVE how well thought out the things she’s relinquished control over are, proving that she is, in fact, in control. this teacher is ensuring that her students have a learning environment that works for them, pushes them and nurtures them, and she clearly works every day to make it continue to happen that way.

Elementary, My Dear, or Far From It: read her Out of Control post

the outside of enough

“Lord Liverpool gave him a long, hard look.  Then he said, “The matter shall not rest here, Mr. Norrell.  But whether it is Strange or not, one thing is clear.  Great Britain already has a mad King; a mad magician would be the outside of enough…”

p. 694

a leftover piece of the funeral

“It is these black clothes,” said Strange. “I am like a leftover piece of the funeral, condemned to walk about the Town, frightening people into thinking of their own mortality.”

Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke, page 528, Chapter 48 – The Engravings  Late February-March 1816                                                                   c 2004, Bloomsbury Publishing